Pet and Livestock Emergency Preparedness PlanningLivestock and Pet Emergency Preparedness Plan

Disaster situations can impact pets and livestock of all sizes and species. The situation may require special shelter and transport requirements as well as food and water needs. Planning ahead for your animals is imperative.

Pet Emergency Preparedness Plan [PDF]

Livestock Emergency Preparedness Plan [PDF]

Pets

Before a Disaster or Emergency

Make a preparedness kit for your pet.

  • Leash and collar: clearly labeled with your pet’s name, your name and a contact number
  • Transport carrier: clearly labeled with your name and a contact number
  • Food and water (5-7 day supply) – don’t forget bowls and a non-electric can opener
  • Any medications for the pet
  • Copies of your pet’s medical and vaccination records (e.g., rabies certificate)
  • Your veterinarian’s name and phone number
  • Paper towels, newspapers, plastic trash bags, disinfectant (e.g., bleach) for waste clean-up
  • Toys or blankets the pet will find familiar

Provide for the special needs of unique pets.

  • Birds/lizards: blanket to keep cage warm, spray bottle to hydrate feathers
  • Snakes: pillowcase to transport, heating pad for warmth, water bowl to soak
  • Pocket pets (hamsters/gerbils): cage/bedding material, water bottles

Store items in a sturdy container that can be easily carried.

  • Covered trash container, duffle bag, plastic tote, bucket

Make sure pets are current on all vaccinations.

Identification

  • All pets should have some sort of identification (collar with tag, microchip).
  • Take a photo of the pet and keep it with the medical records.
  • Include any proof of ownership materials (e.g., registration information, proof of purchase, adoption records, microchip information).

Practice loading your pet into their cage, carrier, or trailer.

Identify pet friendly locations in case of the need to evacuate.

  • Board with friends/relatives in a safe area.
  • Check with your local animal shelter, boarding facility, or veterinary clinic.
  • Pet friendly hotels - www.petswelcome.com

During a Disaster or Emergency

If you are sheltering in place:

  • Bring your pet indoors.
  • Place them inside a carrier or cage to help reduce their stress.

If you need to evacuate:

  • Take your pets with you whenever possible.
  • Allow plenty of time to catch and “load” your pet.
  • Make sure your pet has identification securely fastened to them.
  • Call your prearranged animal evacuation site.

If you must leave your pets behind:

  • NEVER leave pets tied up outside.
  • Leave them untied in an interior room with adequate air and no windows (e.g., bathroom).
  • Purchase a self-feeder in advance and leave enough food and water for 3-5 days.
  • Leave a faucet dripping as a water source; keep the sink drain open.
  • Leave a notice on your front door with the location and type of pets inside, their names and your contact phone number.

After the Disaster or Emergency

A pet’s behavior may change before, during and even after a disaster.

  • In the first few days after the disaster, leash your pets when they go outside.
  • Maintain close contact to help them readjust to the changed environment.

Livestock

Before a Disaster or Emergency

Determine the hazards and risks for your area and animals.

  • Are animal located outside or housed indoors?
  • What is the risk of illness or injury to animals at these locations?

Maintain an inventory.

  • Keep a current list of all animals on your farm.
  • Include their location and any records of vaccinations or testing.

Have identification for all animals.

  • Make sure animals have some form of permanent identification (e.g., ear tags, tattoos).
  • Make sure you have records of ownership for all animals, in cases of loss or displacement.

Identify alternate water or power sources.

Prepare an evacuation kit.

  • Handling equipment (e.g., halters, nose leads)
  • Water, feed, and buckets
  • Medications
  • Tools and supplies needed for sanitation
  • Cell phone, flashlights, portable radios, and batteries
  • Basic first aid kit
  • Safety and emergency items for your vehicles and trailers
  • Gas powered generators

Make evacuation arrangements.

  • Locate and prearrange evacuation sites.
  • Determine routes to these locations and have alternate routes planned as well.
  • Make arrangements for trucks, trailers, or other transport vehicles for livestock as well as experienced handlers and drivers.
  • Condition animals to being loaded and transported.
  • Plan how handling equipment and veterinary care will be obtained at the evacuation site.
  • Arrange for feed and water delivery for the evacuation site.

Establish escape routes to safe locations (e.g., higher elevation).

  • Keep animals from unsafe locations (e.g., barns in flood situations, under trees in severe thunderstorms).

Establish a safe environment for animals.

  • Assess the stability and safety of barns and other structures.
  • Remove dead trees or other debris in fields or animal holding locations.
  • Remove or secure any loose equipment or materials, such as lumber, feed troughs.
  • Make sure wiring for heat lamps or other electrical machinery is safe and away from flammable debris.

 

Additional Preparedness Resources

Pets

Animals in Disasters: Awareness and Preparedness (IS-10.A)
An independent study course to increase awareness and preparedness of animal owners to reduce the impact of disasters on animals.
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)
Animals in Disasters: Community Planning (IS-11.A)
An interactive web-based course to guide emergency management officials, animal owners, and animal care providers in preparing community disaster plans.
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)
Animals in Public Evacuation Centers FAQ
Factsheet discussing issues involved with housing animals in public evacuation centers and guidelines to reduce health risks.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Be Red Cross Ready: Pets and Disaster Safety Checklist
Information on preparing and caring for your pet during disaster situations.
American Red Cross (ARC)
Caring for Animals
Information explaining how to prepare your pets before, during and after a disaster.
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)
Disaster Preparedness for Horse Producers
Factsheet (2 pages) to help horse producers prepared for all types of disasters.
Louisiana State University Ag Center
Disaster Preparedness for Pets
Brochure containing disaster preparedness tips for pets.
The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS)
Guide to Disaster Preparedness
General emergency planning and response protocols related to animal care. Guide also includes useful links and forms.
University of California Division of Food and Natural Resources
Pet Care: Disaster Preparedness
Website listing steps you can take to make disaster preparedness plans for you and your pet.
The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA)
Preparing Your Pets for Emergencies Makes Sense. Get Ready Now.
Tips on preparing an emergency kit for pets and planning what you will do in emergencies to take care of your pets.
Department of Homeland Security
Protect Your Pets in an Emergency
Factsheet of resources for information on making preparedness plans to ensure your pet's safety before, during, and after a disaster situation.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Saving the Whole Family
Booklet (16 pages) containing detailed disaster planning information for small and large animals.
American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA)

Livestock

Animals in Disasters: Awareness and Preparedness (IS-10.A)
An independent study course to increase awareness and preparedness of animal owners to reduce the impact of disasters on animals.
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)
Animals in Disasters: Community Planning (IS-11.A)
An interactive web-based course to guide emergency management officials, animal owners, and animal care providers in preparing community disaster plans.
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)
Caring for Livestock Before Disaster
Factsheet on measures to take to prepare your animals before disaster situations.
Colorado State University Extension
Caring for Livestock During Disaster
Factsheet on measures to take to protect your animals during a disaster situation.
Colorado State University Extension
Disaster Planning for Animal Facilities
Guidelines to help animal facilities (shelters, kennels, veterinary clinics, stables, etc.) determine what plans they can make to mitigate damage from disaster sitautions.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Disaster Planning: Farm Animals
Website to learn how to protect your livestock from disaster and emergency situations.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Disaster Preparedness for Goat and Sheep Producers
Factsheet with information to help small ruminant owners prepare for all types of disasters.
Louisiana State University Ag Center
Disaster Preparedness for Horse Producers
Factsheet (2 pages) to help horse producers prepared for all types of disasters.
Louisiana State University Ag Center
Disaster Readiness for Beef Producers
Factsheet (2 pages) to help beef producers prepared for disasters of all types.
Louisiana State University Ag Center
Disaster Readiness for Dairy Producers
Factsheet (2 page) to help dairy producers prepare their farm and herd for disaster situations.
Louisiana State University Ag Center
Preparing the Farm and Farm Animals for Disasters
Information on preparing your farm and animals before a disaster.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Saving the Whole Family
Booklet (16 pages) containing detailed disaster planning information for small and large animals.
American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA)

Veterinary Clinics

Animals in Public Evacuation Centers FAQ
Factsheet discussing issues involved with housing animals in public evacuation centers and guidelines to reduce health risks.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Disaster Planning for Animal Facilities
Guidelines to help animal facilities (shelters, kennels, veterinary clinics, stables, etc.) determine what plans they can make to mitigate damage from disaster sitautions.
U.S. Department of Agriculture, National Agricultural Library
Emergency Preparedness and Response Guide
A comprehensive 400+ page reference of animal disaster planning information, including templates for animal disaster annexes for county and state emergency operations plans.
American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA)
Interim Guidelines for Animal Health and Control of Disease Transmission in Pet Shelters
Guidance for the care of animals entering shelters and for persons working with or handling the animals in response to natural disasters.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
Pet/Service Animal Preparedness
Website to resources on animal preparedness and rescue, including information for community planners and wildlife rehabilittors
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)